BSA R-10 Info

What are the benefits to tuning your rifle?

It is a good way to make sure you are getting the most out of your rifle. The tune up generally improves the consistency and operation of the rifle and therefore the accuracy. The rifle feels more refined, smoother and in most cases the action noise is reduced. You checked over your rifle, service any parts that need servicing, fit tuning parts, de-burr, lubricate and make sure the power is set to a legal level. 

 What can be done to your rifle?

  • the action and regulator can be stripped, cleaned and examined,
  • any loose or ill fitting parts can be tightened and/or refinished correctly,
  • burrs, crud, tool marks etc can be removed or repaired,
  • any worn or damaged O rings should be replaced and properly lubricated,
  • the firing valve can be adjusted to reduce the difference in power between different pellets,
  • the standard metal spring guide (if fitted) can replaced with a lightweight spring guide,
  • a low friction "slip disk" can be fitted to the hammer assembly to reduce friction,
  • the trigger sears can polished and lubricated to make it smoother,
  • the trigger can be modified to reduce side play and then set to your liking,
  • the ends of the hammer spring and firing valve spring can be de-burred and polished,
  • the transfer port can be modified to improve air flow,
  • the pellet inlet (magazine bridging part) can modified to make it easier to load magazines,
  • the bolt can modified on the Mark 1 so that you do not need to pull it back the extra bit when changing the magazine, it makes changing magazines much easier,
  • you can modify the port in the barrel to improve airflow,
  • you can check the barrel crown and repair/re-crown if necessary,
  • make sure the gun is in good working order,
  • set the power to make sure it is running below 12flbs, unless it is an FAC model,
  • if you use the new style magazines you can remove the indexing to improve consistency,
  • you can fit an aftermarket regulator like the HuMa regulator,
  • this list is not exhaustive but gives you an idea of things that can be done to tune your rifle. 

HuMa Regulator

 This is a new replacement regulator for the BSA R-10, it is offered as a DIY fit regulator. I believe is a great way to improve the consistency and reliability of the R-10. I highly recommend the HuMa regulator if you are planning on shortening your barrel, it is more stable than the standard R-10 regulator at higher regulator pressures (which are needed when the barrel is shortened). You unscrew your old regulator from the regulator block and the new HuMa regulator screws in it's place, then adjust your power. There are fitting instructions to accompany the DIY regulator. For convenience the regulator comes pre-set for your calibre and barrel length but it is also possible to adjust the regulator pressure to fine tune your rifle. They come in different pressure ranges to suit low, medium and high powered (FAC) rifles. The Huma regulators can also be serviced, service kits are available from the eShop.

FAQ: HuMa vs Tench (discontinued) the HuMa regulator is designed specifically for the R-10, it does not involve any machining of the regulator block and the rifle can be put back to standard if need be. The Tench regulator was designed to fit the BSA Ultra/Scorpion. To make the Tench regulator fit the R-10, the regulator block has to be machined and re-ported (which is why they cost more to be fitted than the HuMa and they are not a DIY fit regulator). Both regulators regulate very well and are miles better than the standard R-10 regulator.

Will tuning my rifle affect my BSA warranty?

If you have any BSA warranty on your rifle it will be void after any tuning work or modifications are carried out. The BSA warranty is not transferable when the rifle is second hand, even if bought from a RFD, so if you are not the original owner you will not be covered by the BSA warranty.

Can you thread or shorten my barrel?

Yes but I will no longer shorten R-10 barrels to less than: 12" (305mm) in any calibre unless it is going to be set at below 6ftlbs. Guidance on Firearms Licensing Law Roughly 3" of the barrel is held within the breech and most R-10s have 15" barrels as standard. The very early mark 1 models had 12" barrels and the newer Super Carbine models have 12" barrels. Shortening the barrel will reduce your shot count because shorter barrels are less air efficient. To work on the barrel involves stripping the rifle and removing the anti-tamper devices, which will invalidate the BSA warranty. If the barrel is shortened/lengthened then the regulator pressure and power will need to be altered at the same time. I highly recommend the HuMa or Tench regulator if you are planning on shortening your barrel, they are more stable than the standard R-10 regulator at higher regulator pressures (which are needed when the barrel is shortened). You will need to remove your barrel and send it to me to be shortened or threaded, I don't remove or refit them. 

Can you shorten my shroud?

Yes, shortening the shroud on the mark 1 and Mark is a cost effective way of shortening the R-10, without having to go to the expense and trouble of shortening the barrel and getting the regulator and power adjusted. There are 2 options when it comes to shortening the shroud:

 Shortening from the breech end of the shroud - Early Mark 1 R-10's can be shortened quite a bit because they were fitted with 12" threaded barrels, the later Mark 1 & 2 R-10s can be shortened by around 83mm because they are fitted with 15" barrels. The shroud is shortened and then internally machined and threaded to replicate the original shroud. The springs and plastic baffles are not used after shortening the shroud as there is no space for them inside the shroud.

 Shortening from the muzzle end - This is best if you have a threaded barrel on your R-10 or you plan on using a silencer adaptor fitted to your barrel.

 I will need an accurate length for this to be done, so you will either have to measure the length of the shroud yourself and I will cut it to the length you give me or I will need your action to make my own measurements.

YouTube video showing the shroud fitting and options click me

There is a web page covering the shroud options on my website.


What power should I set set the rifle to after tuning/servicing my airgun?

I would set the gun to around 11.5flbs using a heavy pellet, this gives you a bit of leeway for temperature changes, wear and tear and differences in pellets:

  • in a .177 I would use JSB Heavy 10.3g or Bisley Magnums,
  • in a .22 I would use something like the JSB Exact 15.9g/Air Arms Field 16g.

Please do not set the power of your rifle over the legal limit for your country/state, you could end up getting your rifle confiscated, you could end up in prison and you ruin the sport for everybody else. If you want an airgun that shoots over 12ftlbs then apply for a FAC.


Do you carry spare parts?

I carry the parts you see listed in my eShop, which are being added to all the time. If you need spare parts that are not listed in my eShop you can try some of the suppliers listed on my Guides & Links page.

 Will my rifle need maintenance?

Like any mechanical device, a rifle needs regular maintenance. Parts wear and lubrication can dry out etc. The action and stock should be wiped down with a corrosion inhibitor, moving parts should be lubricated and O rings should be lubricated with a suitable product, like Abbey SM50.

Please don't use 3 in 1 oil or engine oil to lubricate your gun, use proper gun oil.

It is a good idea to clean your barrel with a pull-through when changing brands of pellets or when you notice your groups opening up. 

It is advisable to chronograph your rifle regularly, to ensure it stays below the 12flbs legal limit with ANY commercially available pellets. Chronographs can be bought for as little as £40 and are a worthwhile investment if you want to keep yourself and your airgun on the right side of the law. It is also good to keep an eye on the consistency.

There are videos covering barrel cleaning, rifle maintenance and chronoing in my YouTube channel


What lubricant/oil do you recommend for the airgun?

I use Abbey SM50 or Bisley Gun Lubricant on the O rings and seals.

Any quality gun oil with a corrosion inhibitor like Napier Power Airgun Oil is recommended to wipe down the action, especially after using the airgun outdoors.

Do not spray oil directly into/onto the action because if oil gets onto the hammer it will effect the consistency and is not covered by the warranty.

The stock can be maintained using stock oil or conditioner, available from your local RFD.

Please do not use 3 in 1 oil or engine/motor oil on your action, it does more harm than good.


What are the best pellets for my airgun?

Generally BSA barrels tend to like larger sized pellets 4.52-3 in .177 and 5.52 in .22.

The actual choice of pellet is personal to your barrel/gun combination, there is no one pellet that is perfect for all barrels. The best way to find your barrels' favourite pellet is to try a number of different brands of pellets to see which gives you the best grouping, remembering to clean your barrel when swapping pellet types. Sample packs of pellets are available on the internet. I not recommend the use of pointed or plastic pellets if you plan on shooting accurately past 20yards.

When using a chronograph to check your airgun is legal, make sure you use a pellet that gives the highest power/efficiency.

In a .177 I would try Bisley Magnums, JSB Exact Heavy, JSB Exact 4.53mm, Daystate Sovereign, Air Arms Field.

In a .22 I would try Air Arms Field, Falcon Accuracy Plus, JSB Exact, JSB Exact Express, Daystate Sovereign...

It is your responsibility to ensure your airgun is set below the legal limit.


Where can I find out more information about my airgun?

One of the best resources for BSA airgun information is the BSA Owners Group forum.

You can also find information on the BSA website.

R-10 exploded parts diagram click me.

YouTube channel showing loads of useful R-10 maintenance tips & repairs click me.